History

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Rebellion of the north

Rebellion of the north

Year 9 Holiday Homework

Role of the Netherlands

Term 2 Homework

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Term 1 Homework

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

KS3 Overview

Year 7

Term 1: What Am I…A Historian; defining history, chronology, methods of historical enquiry, the story of Britain up to 1066, England before 1066.

Term 2: Who will be the next King of England, Battle of Stamford Bridge, The Battle of Hastings, How did King Harold die, the conquest of England, William the castle-builder.

Term 3: The Domesday Book, the feudal system, how did castles develop, the siege of Rochester castle, who’s who in a castle, where have all our castles gone?

Term 4: Religious beliefs in the Middle Ages, The Wars of the Cross, Cuthbert the Crusader, Chronicles of the Crusades, life in a medieval village.

Term 5: Medieval towns, Hygiene and entertainment in Medieval Britain, Fashion in Medieval England, Revision.

Term 6: Exam term, feedback and overview of year 8 topics.

Year 8

Term 1: Britain in 1509? A young Henry VIII, changes to religion, Henry VIII and his wives, Protestantism, Sinking of the Mary Rose.

Term 2: Bloody Mary, Mary;s nursery rhyme , Elizabeth’s middle-way, judging the Tudors, the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci, Exploring the world and Christopher Columbus.

Term 3: Tudor society, Tudor schools, entertainment during Tudor times, Shakespeare, Tudor fashion, daily routine during the Tudor times, crime watch, torture in Tudor times.

Term 4: How did Britain build an empire, Slave trade, Blackbeard, Young Elizabeth, Elizabeth’s appearance, the Spanish Armada, investigating Elizabeth’s portrait.

Term 5: Enter the Stuarts, the fifth of November, witch hunting, English settlers in America, 1642 Civil War, revision.

Term 6: Exam term, feedback and overview of year 9 topics.

Year 9

Term 1: Britain and the world in 1901, Poverty in Britain, why is the Titanic so famous, who was to blame for the Titanic disaster, women’s suffrage and Emily Davison.

Term 2: The Great War, why the Great War started, joining up and conscription, propaganda and fighting in the war.

Term 3: GCSE Edexcel History: Early Elizabethan England; Queen, government and religion 1558-69: The situation on Elizabeth’s succession, the settlement of religion, challenge to the religious settlement

Term 4: Early Elizabethan England; Queen, government and religion 1558-69: the problem of Mary, Queen of Scots, recap and review; Challenges at home and abroad: Plots and revolts at home.

Term 5: Early Elizabethan England; Challenges at home and abroad: Relations with Spain, outbreak of war with Spain, the Armada, recap and review, Elizabethan society in the age of Exploration, 1558-1588: Early Education and leisure, the problem of the poor.

Term 6: Elizabethan society in the age of Exploration: Exploration and voyages of discovery, Raleigh and Virginia, writing historically, recap and review.
Exams.

KS4 Overview

Term 1: Early Elizabethan England; Queen, government and religion 1558-69: The situation on Elizabeth’s succession, the settlement of religion, challenge to the religious settlement, the problem of Mary, Queen of Scots, recap and review.

Term 2: Early Elizabethan England; Challenges to Elizabeth at home and abroad, 1569-88: Plots and revolts at home, relations with Spain, outbreak of war with Spain, the Armada, recap and review.

Term 3: Early Elizabethan England; Elizabethan society in the age of Exploration, 1558-1588: Education and leisure, the problem of the poor, exploration and voyages of discovery, Raleigh and Virginia, writing historically, recap and review.

Term 4: Crime and punishment through time, c1000 – present; Crime, punishment and law enforcement in medieval England: crime, punishment and law enforcement in Anglo – Saxon England, Norman England and the later Middle Ages, case study: the influence of Church on crime and punishment, recap and review.

Crime, punishment and law enforcement in early Modern England; changing definitions of crime, law enforcement and punishment, case study: Gunpowder plotters (1605), witchcraft and the law, recap and review.

Term 5: Crime, punishment and law enforcement in the 18th and 19th centuries; changing definitions of crime and changing attitudes to punishment, law enforcement (c1700 – c1900), case study: Pentonville Prison and The reforms of Robert Peel, recap and review.

Crime, punishment and law enforcement in recent time; changing definitions of crime and changing attitudes to punishment, law enforcement (c1900 – present), case study: Conscientious objectors, the Derek Bentley case and abolition of capital punishment, recap and review.

Term 6: Whitechapel, c187 – c1900: Crime, policing and the inner city; policing the nation, the local context of Whitechapel, tensions in Whitechapel, police organisations in Whitechapel, investigative policing in Whitechapel, recap and review.

Purpose of study

A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Aims

The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
    gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts:
  • understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales